El RayoLab

Blanket octopus

Tremoctopus is a genus of pelagic cephalopods, containing four species that occupy surface to mid-waters in subtropical and tropical oceans. These magnificent sea creatures have cape-like webs that extend down their longest arms. The ‘blanket’, which can be rolled when not in use, makes them appear much bigger, helping them fend off predators. But these octopuses have an even more amazing defence strategy. They are immune to the sting of the deadly Portuguese man-o-wars, which means they can collect the jellyfish-like creature poisonous tentacles and use them as weapons against would-be attackers.

The Cat that Loves Water:

Determined scientists and photographers finally capture images of the rare and elusive fishing cat

by Morgan Heim

WE KNEW OUR INTENTION TO PHOTOGRAPH FISHING CATS in the wilds of Southeast Asia wouldn’t be easily accomplished. Other than National Geographic Society filmmakers Belinda Wright and Stanley Breeden, who took a few pictures of the cats in the 1990s, few people had seen, let alone photographed, the animals in the wild. In fact, since 2003, Thai biologist Passanan Cutter, founder of the Fishing Cat Research and Conservation Project, has observed only one free-roaming cat.

Science knows little about the fishing cat, which embraces a rather unfeline affinity for water. The animal lives in Southeast Asian swamps, where it swims and hunts fish. Weighing up to 30 pounds, it has adapted to its aquatic environment: It has webbed feet, short legs, tiny ears, spotted, almost water-resistant fur and a muscular tail it uses as a rudder.

Jim Sanderson, a member of the IUCN Cat Specialist Group and founder of the Small Cat Conservation Alliance, believes the species numbers no more than 3,000 individuals, scattered mostly throughout Thailand, India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Rampant habitat destruction, persecution and the bush-meat trade have caused an estimated decline in the cat’s numbers of more than 50 percent since those photos taken by Breeden and Wright in the 1990s…

(read more: National Wildlife Federation)

photos by Morgan Heim

Slow motions increibles, un laboratorio donde los entrenan, dimorfismo sexual asociado a la preferencia diferencial de flores, detallado analisis a su faceta cazadora, sonidos originados por el paso del aire por la plumas, migraciones epicas y mas….

NO SE PIERDA EL FASCINANTE MUNDO DE LOS PICAFLORES!

http://sciencemadeeasy.kinja.com/what-can-we-learn-from-the-tree-of-sex-1585353821/+Faz-Alam
No sabe no sabe, tiene que aprender, orejas de burro le vamos a poner…..
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10336-014-1098-9

No sabe no sabe, tiene que aprender, orejas de burro le vamos a poner…..

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10336-014-1098-9

Bornean bristlehead: a rare bird from Borneo
The Bornean bristlehead, Pityriasis gymnocephala, is an enigmatic bird, meriting not only its own genus, but also its own family (Pityriaseidae).
It is a medium sized passerine, about 25cm in length, with many distinctive features: (i) the massive, hooked, black bill is disproportionately large, and has a subterminal rounded “tooth”; (ii) the feathers of the crown are sparse and modified into short, extraordinary yellow-orange skin tubercles; (iii) the ear coverts and feathers of the lower throat are stiff and bristly; and (iv) the face, throat, neck, and thighs are red in both sexes.
The Bornean bristlehead is rarely encountered and is considered to be uncommon even in its prime habitat. The species, regarded as Near Threatened, is endemic to the island of Borneo, where can be found in Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Robert Chong
Locality: RDC Sepilok, Sandakan, Sabah, East Malaysia

Bornean bristlehead: a rare bird from Borneo

The Bornean bristlehead, Pityriasis gymnocephala, is an enigmatic bird, meriting not only its own genus, but also its own family (Pityriaseidae).

It is a medium sized passerine, about 25cm in length, with many distinctive features: (i) the massive, hooked, black bill is disproportionately large, and has a subterminal rounded “tooth”; (ii) the feathers of the crown are sparse and modified into short, extraordinary yellow-orange skin tubercles; (iii) the ear coverts and feathers of the lower throat are stiff and bristly; and (iv) the face, throat, neck, and thighs are red in both sexes.

The Bornean bristlehead is rarely encountered and is considered to be uncommon even in its prime habitat. The species, regarded as Near Threatened, is endemic to the island of Borneo, where can be found in Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Robert Chong

Locality: RDC Sepilok, Sandakan, Sabah, East Malaysia

No hay que estudiar biologia para apreciar y cuidar la naturaleza… una mujer para admirar:
http://www.paula.cl/reportaje/la-reina-de-los-picaflores/

No hay que estudiar biologia para apreciar y cuidar la naturaleza… una mujer para admirar:

http://www.paula.cl/reportaje/la-reina-de-los-picaflores/

Orange-footed Scrubfowl (Megapodius reinwardt)
…a species of megapode (Megapodiidae) which occurs in southern New Guinea, northern Australia and many islands in Wallacea. M. rienwardt typically inhabits a wide range of forests and scrubland. Like other galliform birds orange-footed srubfowl are chiefly terrestrial and will forage for seeds, fallen fruit, and a range of invertebrates. In typical megapode fashion orange-footed scrubfowl do not incubate their eggs with body heat, but instead will build a massive mound of decaying vegetation and sand to keep their eggs incubated. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Galliformes-Megapodiidae-Megapodius-M. rienwardt
Image: Toby Hudson

Orange-footed Scrubfowl (Megapodius reinwardt)

…a species of megapode (Megapodiidae) which occurs in southern New Guinea, northern Australia and many islands in Wallacea. M. rienwardt typically inhabits a wide range of forests and scrubland. Like other galliform birds orange-footed srubfowl are chiefly terrestrial and will forage for seeds, fallen fruit, and a range of invertebrates. In typical megapode fashion orange-footed scrubfowl do not incubate their eggs with body heat, but instead will build a massive mound of decaying vegetation and sand to keep their eggs incubated. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Galliformes-Megapodiidae-Megapodius-M. rienwardt

Image: Toby Hudson

this is probably the first gif of a megamouth shark Megachasma pelagios. enjoy it

also, is one of three recordings of this shy animal.  As of 2012 only 55 megamouth individuals are known and have been found all over the world, with most originating from the Pacific.